Four line-projecting lasers are mounted at locations comprised of the vertices of a rectangle. Due to the nature of lasers, the light is detectable only on a surface of intersection, so there is a glowing green line on everything within the work’s reach. The work’s title refers to the liquid crystal display (LCD) screens used in modern technology, such as televisions, laptops, and phones. The screen represents a field of existence, a place where one can look to gain information from the world at large. “LCD” can also mean ‘lowest common denominator’, a basic trait that can be universally applied to a population.

Casey Lynch is a conceptual artist and creative writer living in Atlanta, Georgia, with his wife, Jennifer, and their daughter, Vivienne. He is Part-time Faculty at Savannah College of Art and Design and Georgia Gwinnett College, teaching sculpture and critical theory at the former, and art appreciation at the latter. He recently completed a large-scale installation for the newly-named Malinda Jolley Mortin Gallery (former Clayton Gallery) as part of the grand opening of the Zuckerman Museum of Art at Kennesaw State University (2014). A native of Columbus, GA, Casey has a bachelor’s of science in Psychology from Columbus State University, a BFA in Sculpture from the Atlanta College of Art (2006), and his MFA in Sculpture from the Rhode Island School of Design (2009). As an artist, he has exhibited locally and across the country. Recent public art works have been included in Art on the Atlanta Beltline (2012), Edge/Public (Off the Edge) (2012), and the Sculpture Walk in Columbus, GA (2012-2014.) Lynch has written for the Atlanta-based online magazine, BURNAWAY.org, and been published in an anthology of critical essays by young artists/professionals entitled, 20UNDER40: Reinventing the Arts and Arts Education for the 21st Century (2010). He has participated in various lecture series, including speaking at the Harvard Arts and Creativity Research Colloquium at Harvard University (2009).