At a distance, viewers will see a large figure carrying a very large load of boxes. As they approach the sculpture they will appreciate that the figure is very large, standing 9 feet tall at its head and 15 feet tall including its load of boxes. Viewers also notice thousands of small holes piercing the boxes on the figures back. The figure’s body is made of rigid facets of welded metal painted the colors of work clothes.

It is hunched, yet strong, in a frozen march carrying the enormous load. As the viewers move around the sculpture to view the figure’s face, they find a large void. The figure’s coat and hood is an empty shell. Within the coat is a large hole passing through the figures back into the load of boxes.

At this time the viewer will notice the hand holds, steps, and platform within the sculpture. They now realize the sculpture is designed for them to pass through the figure and crawl into the boxes. When the viewer enters the figure’s load they realize the holes piercing the boxes represent a star chart of the northern and southern hemispheres. The inside of the box is painted flat black and the sunlight illuminates all of the holes creating a sensation of being in space among the stars.

This sculpture is of a worker in the act of a difficult task. I hope it also provides the viewer a place to think about how humble tasks support larger ideas with seemingly infinite potential.

Mike Wsol is an Assistant Professor – Three Dimensional Studies – Sculpture at the Ernest G. Welch School of Art and Design – Georgia State University